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Plan B, C, D....


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Has anyone developed a plan B if you don't get an acceptance for Fall 2015? If I don't get an acceptance, I haven't yet decided if I'll go another round of applications...

 

I have a bachelor's degree in human resource management and worked as a business manager for almost 3 years before taking CDS prereqs and applying for SLP grad programs to begin Fall 2015. 

 

I'm looking for ideas of other options...

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I'll definitely be applying again if I am rejected off of waitlists. If I don't get one of the Research Assistant positions I applied for, I plan on spending the next year doing lots of volunteering in different types of clinics, as well as becoming an adult literacy tutor. I also plan on being more involved in organizations that aren't necessarily related to SLP, but that I have a huge interest in. Make yourself stand out!

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I have not applied yet, but have thought of Plan B's. 

Such include: 

-Observing SPED/reg ed classrooms and applying to a dual SPED/reg teacher credentialing program

-Taking pre-reqs to apply for a Masters in School Counseling, or Admissions Counseling (for a high school/university)

-Going ABA and eventually taking the exam for that 

-Taking ECE units and working as a preschool teacher

-Taking SLPA courses

-Doing Americorps Literacy program for a year

-Teaching English abroad

-Au pairing for a year in another country 

 

The above is a mixture of "gap year" fillers and total career path changers. Hope such gives some ideas! (: 

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What specifically is your area of interest within SLP? I think it's easier to formulate a Plan B that will make you a more attractive reapplicant if you do something related to whatever that area of interest is.

 

My youngest child has multiple disabilities and I know that there are always plenty of openings in the following jobs. The pay isn't great and not all employers offer benefits but you will get relevant experience:

-special education aide/paraeducator

-Applied Behavioral Analysis interventionist

-Early Intervention preschool teacher (check state regulations since you might need a certain number of credit hours in child development/ECE for this)

-Lindamood-Bell tutor

 

If you want to make good money and are willing to invest in the training, educational therapy is something to consider. That's actually what my original Plan A was before the audiologist discovered my daughter's hearing loss and I decided SLP would be a better way to help her.

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I'm going to try for an SLPA job or at ASHA headquarters (Rockville, MD). Looking for an employer that has Tution reimbursement. Also, thinking about volunteering at hospital or doing something in outpatient setting since, I want to start as an SLP in the medical field (and I have limited experience here and with adults).

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I am a second year applicant and was accepted this time around. I was reading this thread and wanted to give input because I know how disappointing and frustrating it can be not getting into a program, and I hope what I say can help! After getting 8 rejections last year, I emailed many of the schools I applied to to get an idea of why I got rejected/what they were looking for in an applicant. Many told meh GRE scores didn't meet their requirements, so I knew that was something I needed to work on. I used the Magoosh online GRE program and raised my score almost 10 points. I volunteered at the Northeast Arc where I worked with adults with disabilities once a week for 1 hour a week-even if you can only volunteer once a week it looks very good to be doing). It is also hard to find an SLPA job in Mass, so I worked as a para at a high school with a boy on the Autism spectrum, I worked as an ABA therapist, took sign language, and put a ton of effort into my SOP (I think being a para and doing ABA helped me a lot). What helped me the most I think was really researching schools. Email schools this summer and ask what their standards are, what exactly is their criteria for accepting students, do they mainly accept their own students, how many students apply? Some schools ONLY ACCEPT their own undergrads and do not post that on the website, you need to email them and ask (which is very inconsiderate and unfair). I hope this information helps!!

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I'm considering grad programs like public health, healthcare administration, school psychology, and special education.

I have an undergrad in public health. There are very limited number of jobs you can hold with a bachelors and they are not well paying. You need a masters to apply and hold any job in that field. It's very difficult to get a job in the Metro DC area but, I know Atlanta, GA has the CDC headquarters with a few programs and internships. The field pay is average, unless you land a government job.

 

Healthcare Administration is very difficult. Most students walk out with Bachelor's and Master's degrees with no job. This is a field where they need you to have years of experience in the healthcare field (doing any other job then management) with experience surpervising employees, before they hire you. Most people I know have landed research jobs or have gone back to school for a nursing degree.

 

Your best bet for any of these degrees, is to talk to grad programs and ask about their job placement rates and additional student outcome data. Don't spend money on a degree that won't get you a job in the career field.

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Another option for students willing to apply again next year for grad school, is to apply for a job that you qualify for at the university you are interested in attending. Most jobs are open to the public, some require no experience or very limited experience. At most universities you get a discounted rate for classes, if you are an employee. Thus, you can take an extra class or two in your subject area (at a higher course level too) and up your GPA, while proving you can be a successful student at their university. Some colleges (UMD) like to keep their own students, so you may also have this advantage when applying to schools. You also get to meet department heads, professors and maybe even current students in your program of choice etc.

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I have an undergrad in public health. There are very limited number of jobs you can hold with a bachelors and they are not well paying. You need a masters to apply and hold any job in that field. It's very difficult to get a job in the Metro DC area but, I know Atlanta, GA has the CDC headquarters with a few programs and internships. The field pay is average, unless you land a government job.

 

Healthcare Administration is very difficult. Most students walk out with Bachelor's and Master's degrees with no job. This is a field where they need you to have years of experience in the healthcare field (doing any other job then management) with experience surpervising employees, before they hire you. Most people I know have landed research jobs or have gone back to school for a nursing degree.

 

Your best bet for any of these degrees, is to talk to grad programs and ask about their job placement rates and additional student outcome data. Don't spend money on a degree that won't get you a job in the career field.

 

 

Thanks for the heads up! 

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My plan C is to take an 8 course certificate program in ASL.  The thought of being conversation in ASL excites me. Hopefully, will help in my quest to be a SLP. Who knows? :D  I may ditch ASL all together and become an interpreter! 

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Any idea about short term courses that I could do ? I'm an undergrad in speech path , but I'm wait listed at a few programs don't know if I'll make it so I'm considering a short term course before applying again for the next cycle if at all I need to ! But I'm having trouble finding enough information so it would be good if anyone could help me through it

Thanks !

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Spring is less competitive but only few schools offers that.

If you are from CA, pass your CBEST and get job in schools, that will be plus, try to get SLPA job.

Do more volunteer work.

Try to find paid or volunteer work at nursing homes. 

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The CBEST is super-easy, especially compared to the GRE.

 

A lot of dyslexia remediation training programs operate over the summer and after you complete them, you can get initial certification and start working as a tutor or academic language practiitioner.

Here are a few lists:

 

IMSLEC: http://www.imslec.org/directory.asp?action=accredited

AOGPE: http://www.ortonacademy.org/training_courses.php

Wilson: http://www.wilsonlanguage.com/FS_PD_Public_Workshops.htm

Slingerland: https://www.regonline.com/builder/site/?eventid=1661625

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Thank you so much ! The problem is I'm an international applicant , and so I don't know if these programs will be valid for me , but I'm gonna email them and try ! Has anyone pursued these remediation training programs , and can give me first hand review about it , that would be great !

Thanks a tonne !

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Wilson might be a good choice since most of the training can be done online. You'd need to do the introductory workshop (usually held over a weekend) and then the rest of the training is online. The practicum requirement can be done using a local student and then emailing the videos to your mentor (this is what a lot of folks do in order to save $$$).

 

Dyslexia Training Institute is 100% online but it's not quite as marketable a certification as Wilson or the other ones listed above. http://www.dyslexiatraininginstitute.org/certification.html

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Wilson might be a good choice since most of the training can be done online. You'd need to do the introductory workshop (usually held over a weekend) and then the rest of the training is online. The practicum requirement can be done using a local student and then emailing the videos to your mentor (this is what a lot of folks do in order to save $$$).

Dyslexia Training Institute is 100% online but it's not quite as marketable a certification as Wilson or the other ones listed above. http://www.dyslexiatraininginstitute.org/certification.html

Thank you so much ! Is there any other focus other than dyslexia that I could do a course on ?
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Most ed therapists focus on reading but others focus on dyscalculia (math LD), executive functioning deficits, etc. I haven't really looked into training programs for those because my special needs child is actually strong in math and EF is more for middle school & up rather than the primary grades.

 

Dyslexia remediation would be the area of ed therapy most relevant for SLP since many kids with speech & language impairments also have dyslexia. MGH actually has a MS-SLP program with a concentration in reading that is IMSLEC-accredited. There may be other SLP programs with a reading concentration as well.

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If I don't get in anywhere I think I'm giving up on SLP, which is too bad because I think I'd love it. But I spent probably $1000 on applications/GRE/etc this year and it was all for nothing. The main thing though is that I don't have anyone to get letters of rec from. The professors I asked this year didn't know me that well and by the time another year goes by they'll probably have forgotten about me. 

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If I don't get in anywhere I think I'm giving up on SLP, which is too bad because I think I'd love it. But I spent probably $1000 on applications/GRE/etc this year and it was all for nothing. The main thing though is that I don't have anyone to get letters of rec from. The professors I asked this year didn't know me that well and by the time another year goes by they'll probably have forgotten about me. 

Why don't you take a few extra classes to up your CSD GPA? Comm. D. electives, ASL, etc? You can apply as a leveling or post-bacc student and only take a few courses. Or you can apply as a non-degree seeking student (undergrad or grad). Online programs are highly competitive because they get so many applicants. I would do your best to steer clear of those if you choose to apply again. You should defiently reach out to schools and see if they will consider taking G.P.A.'s below 3.5.

 

Also, getting your writing score and math score up to at least the 50th percentile will help.

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If anyone is still interested in testing their luck with one more school, I confirmed Jacksonville University is still accepting applications until May 15th for this Fall!! They still have spots! They have only recieved over 200 applications, average combined GRE scores 290, with an average writing of 3.5.  ASHA  says they accept students 2.44-3.75 GPA. They seem to be a newer program, next Accrediation Review is February 2018. Tuition is $47,080 without doing an optional semester. There seem to be a few graduate assistantships available in other departments but, can't find them on the website yet. Hope this helps! :)

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If anyone is still interested in testing their luck with one more school, I confirmed Jacksonville University is still accepting applications until May 15th for this Fall!! They still have spots! They have only recieved over 200 applications, average combined GRE scores 290, with an average writing of 3.5.  ASHA  says they accept students 2.44-3.75 GPA. They seem to be a newer program, next Accrediation Review is February 2018. Tuition is $47,080 without doing an optional semester. There seem to be a few graduate assistantships available in other departments but, can't find them on the website yet. Hope this helps! :)

 

Thanks for this info!!! I am now debating trying to apply here!!! Did you talk to someone from the program?

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Yea, Brittany Copeland. She's the Academic Advisor for College of Health Sciences. Bcopela@ju.edu

They also over 5 grad Assistantships (various departments) that give a 10K stipend and partial meal plan! Check their student employment out.

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  • 3 months later...

I'm considering grad programs like public health, healthcare administration, school psychology, and special education.

I am considering public health as a back up plan as well! Of course, speech pathology is where my heart is, but continuing my education is also what I really would like to do, and I want something to fall back on. I’d love to hear opinions about my plan B as well. Could I possibly incorporate topics that involve speech pathology/early intervention in the public health field? I am new to it, I’ve researched it, and it seems extremely diverse, but vague! What's the job outlook or positions with a masters in public health? I heard people in the public health field make well over 100k a year.

 

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