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Lenina Crow

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About Lenina Crow

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  1. Yes, at least 1. Some programs want you to mention 2 or 3 that might be a good fit.
  2. Agreed with the above. Your SOP can have similar elements across applications but should absolutely be tailored to each program. Something else to keep in mind is that each program might specify something different that they want in a SOP (some have strict word lengths, some have a detailed outline, some are very general). You want to make sure your SOP for each program fits what they are expecting.
  3. In general, you'll want to have research experience (definitely for PhD programs, and it helps for the more reputable PsyD programs), good GRE scores (aim for 320+), 3 strong letters of recommendation from psychology or related faculty, and a good undergraduate GPA.
  4. Like PsyDgrad pointed out, if you are interested in a clinically focused career and subsequently a clinically focused degree, an online program would not suffice. What do you mean that you want it to "set you up" for a PsyD? Masters degrees arent required for doctoral programs, though they're sometimes recommended to boost your application (though I'm sorry to say an online masters is not likely to boost your application in any substantial way, and may actually be a detriment to your application. Online degrees in our field are not looked upon fondly). A reputable in person masters degree can be good if you had a poor undergraduate GPA, but otherwise, you can gain experience through other means (volunteer or paid research assistant, for example).
  5. Cold emailing works though it can take a while before you get a hit. Do you live in or near a major metro area?
  6. I would definitely get more research experience because you will be competing against other applicants who have presented at national conferences and possibly have publications. Your undergrad GPA is great, so if you could secure a research position and work in it for at least a year (though 2 would probably be better), get great LORs and do well on the GREs, you'd be in great shape.
  7. It might also be worth checking out magoosh. They have a ton of video lessons on basic math principles and test taking strategies, and they also provide video explanations for all of their practice questions.
  8. Scores are good for 5 years so assuming you are still in that range when you apply, it shouldn't be an issue.
  9. If you want to practice, you will need to attend a (hopefully APA accredited) clinical or counseling program.
  10. Barring any major unforeseeable disasters, choosing not to attend a university after the April 15th date will likely result in burning some bridges with that professor. At this point, they are unlikely to offer that position to whoever was ranked below you. Out of curiosity, what makes you think you can't pursue academia at this university? Not all tenure track professors come from a higher ranked university. If you really focus on research productivity, you should be fine.
  11. Go for it. The worst they can do is not invite you to interview. Just because you didn't get in last round, doesn't mean they didnt like you!
  12. I personally found Magoosh helpful (did the 6 month plan), as well as membean for the verbal section (this was my weaker area).
  13. One of the best pieces of advice I got from a previous advisor and current letter writer was to ask for strong letters of recommendation when applying--dont just ask for a letter.
  14. Absolutely this. During my last application round, I had 2 years less research experience and my GRE scores were not nearly as competitive. However, I still managed to land a few interviews, 1 of which at a prestigious university, thanks to my research fit and my SOP (definitely didn't have any connections to any of the programs). Ended up being first alternate at that program, which I think was largely due to my very luke-warm interview. It wasnt terrible, but I definitely didnt have the interview skills I do now and I think that is what hindered me the most. Stats absolutely help get you in the door, but excellent stats will not compensate for a poorly written SOP or a presumptuous personality.
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