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GREMasterEMPOWERRichC

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    Crushing Standardized Tests and teaching others how to do the same
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  1. Hi bilibili, This question can be solved in a number of different ways - including TESTing THE ANSWERS. We know that there are 8 girls and 20 boys to start, and a certain number of girls joined and TWICE as many boys left the class (leaving us with a ratio of 7 girls for every 4 boys). We're asked for the number of boys that LEFT the class. To start, since the number of boys who left is TWICE the number of girls who joined, the number of boys who left MUST be an EVEN number (so we can eliminate Answers A and C immediately). Let's TEST Answer D: 12 boys IF... 12 boys left and 6 girls joined, we would have.... 8 + 6 = 14 girls 20 - 12 = 8 boys 14:8 = 7:4 This is an exact match for what we were told, so this MUST be the answer. Final Answer: D GRE Masters aren't born, they're made, Rich
  2. Hi LeonidBasin, To start, I have a few questions about your timeline and goals: 1) How did you score on the GMAT (including the Quant and Verbal Scaled Scores)? 2) What Schools are you planning to apply to? 3) When are you planning to apply? GMAT Quant and GRE Quant have a great deal in common. In real basic terms, GRE Quant questions are easier (on average) but you have less time to answer those questions (on average). So you have to be relatively 'quick' about recognizing patterns and doing the necessary work. Thankfully, the GRE is just as consistent and predictable as the GMAT, so you CAN train to score at a higher level. GRE Masters aren't born, they're made, Rich
  3. Hi RandomDancing, For dual-degree Programs, you have to be careful to be sure that BOTH Programs will accept the standardized test Score that you submit. If, for example, the MPP Program(s) that you're interested in did not accept a GRE score, then you really should NOT be studying for that Exam. You would likely be best served by contacting the individual Schools/Programs directly and asking. GRE Masters aren't born, they're made,
  4. HI WBWhite17, Have you taken either of the Official ETS practice MSTs? Those are the most realistic practice GREs on the market, so (assuming that you take them in a realistic fashion) they should provide you with the most realistic score assessments. The wording of the last sentence in your post is a bit vague - are you saying that you were scheduled to take the GRE (this past) Friday? If that's the case, then how did you score? GRE Masters aren't born, they're made, Rich
  5. Hi Mayurb29, Test Day is a rather specific event - the details are specific and they matter, so you have to do your best to 'mirror' those details when you take your practice MSTs. The more you deviate during your practice, the more your scores can be "off" (and that often means 'inflated'). Here are some things to consider when you took/take your MSTs: 1) Did you take the FULL MST (including the Essays)? 2) Did you take the MST at home? 3) Did you start it at the same time of day as your Official GRE? 4) Did you do anything during your MST that you couldn't do on Test Day (skip sections, pause the Test, take longer breaks, etc.)? 5) Had you taken that Exam before? Did you see any questions that you already knew the answers to? Thankfully, the GRE is a consistent, predictable Exam, so you CAN train to score at a higher level. GRE Masters aren't born, they're made, Rich
  6. Hi Kabir77, PhD Programs tend to be highly competitive - since there are so few slots for the number of applicants. As such, Admissions Committees tend to really 'nitpick' each application. The value of a high GRE score cannot be overlooked in this situation. Since the GRE is a consistent, predictable Exam which can be prepared for, your scores are not particularly impressive. With your prior schooling, you likely could score much higher on the GRE, but you have not properly trained to score at a high level on the Exam. Since your Official GRE scores are essentially identical, "your way" of dealing with the Exam will likely continue to earn you a score at this general level. To significantly improve, you'll need to learn and practice some new Tactics - and that will require that you invest in some new practice materials. In addition, since you've studied for 9 months, you've likely developed some 'bad habits' that will take time to fix (and replace with new 'good habits'). This is all meant to say that you could probably make some big improvements in 2 months of consistent, guided study - and that might exactly what you need to put together a strong application for the Programs that you plan to (re)apply to. GRE Masters aren't born, they're made, Rich
  7. Hi Fr1224, Many Schools/Programs expect an AWA score of 4.0 or higher, so this AWA score might be an issue for you (if you want to know what a particular School expects of you though, you should contact the Admissions Committee and ask!). A 2.5 means that you didn't write what the prompt asked you to write about - and you likely went 'off topic.' There might also be other issues, including length/thoroughness, grammar/style, etc., but the bigger factors would be the initial ones that I mentioned. GRE Masters aren't born, they're made, Rich
  8. Hi Kabir, Before I can offer you the specific advice that you're looking for, I'd like to know a bit more about how you studied and your goals: 1) What were your exact scores on your 2 GREs (including the score breakdowns for each section)? 2) How long did you study for each attempt? What study materials did you use? 3) What application deadlines are you facing? GRE Masters aren't born, they're made, Rich
  9. Hi sociologicals, If you're concerned about whether your Official Score Report might arrive late or not, you should try contacting each School directly and explaining your situation. It's likely that the Admissions Committees just need your application in on time (and if your GRE Score Report arrives a couple of days late, then it's not a big deal). Let them know your Test Date and ask if it's okay if your Report comes a bit late. GRE Masters aren't born, they're made, Rich
  10. Hi Feanor, That report is likely focused on general Grad School applications at each of those Schools. However, if you're applying for PhD Programs at those Schools, then the level of competition will likely be higher. With a Q163, you likely already know all of the 'math' that you need to know to score higher (even a perfect 170) - but if you're treating the Quant section of the GRE as if it were a 'math test' then that's part of why you have not scored higher. It's actually a 'critical thinking test' that uses math as the gauge, so if you do plan to retest, you should focus a bit more on Quant Tactics, patterns, etc. 1) What application deadlines are you facing? 2) What study materials did you use to prepare for the GRE? GRE Masters aren't born, they're made, Rich
  11. HI ironshieldmaiden, From what you've described, the immediate application deadlines for these Programs are coming up soon, but what are those deadlines exactly? Are there any later application Rounds? And what are the average GRE Scores at each of these Programs? GRE Masters aren't born, they're made, Rich
  12. Hi dreamchaser, As a general rule, Grad Schools expect you to have taken the GRE and submitted your application by the application deadline - so even if it takes a few extra days for your Official Score to be sent in, then they're often fine with that. Many Programs receive so many applications that it can take weeks (or months) for the Admissions Committees to properly read through them all, so it would be surprising for a School to 'ding' you because of the time that it takes for ETS to process your report. Thankfully, there's actually a really easy way to find out how the specific Programs that you're interstate in address this issue - ASK them directly. GRE Masters aren't born, they're made, Rich
  13. Hi Christine, If you know the specific Programs that you plan to apply to, then you should be able to research them so that you can get a better sense of how 'competitive' your current GRE score actually is. Given how you described your prior studies, a month of consistent work could help lead to a significant improvement in your Quant scores. 1) What application deadlines are you facing? GRE Masters aren't born, they're made, Rich
  14. HI Mered, As a general rule, you don't want to do much studying right before your Exam. "Cramming" isn't particularly beneficial in these types of situations and you'd be better served by going into your Exam well-rested and ready to work. That having been said, a bit of light review is fine and working through some practice questions the morning of your Exam can help to get your mind into 'test mode' (just don't work on anything too difficult). GRE Masters aren't born, they're made, Rich
  15. Hi Evelynne, If you know the specific Schools that you plan to apply to, then you should be able to research the Schools/Programs in a bit more detail so that you can get a better sense of the type of GRE score that you would need to be considered a competitive applicant. PhD Programs tend to be highly competitive though - since there are so few spots for the pool of applicants - so Admissions Committees tend to 'nitpick' the OVERALL application. This is meant to say that you'll likely need more than just a strong GRE score to get into your first-choice Program. When you take your practice MSTs, you should plan to make each experience as realistic as possible. This means that you need to take the FULL TEST (with both Essays), take the Test away from your home, at the same time of day as your Official GRE, etc. Taking the Test at night, after work, is NOT realistic, so you should try to avoid that. If that's the most recent score though, then we have to assume that a Q154/V154 is your current ability level. To hit your goal scores, you're going to have to put some significant effort into BOTH the Quant and Verbal sections. You should study as you see fit for the next week, then take a new practice MST. That score result will provide some important information about how well you're progressing. If you don't see any meaningful improvement, then you'll likely need to invest in some new practice materials and learn/practice some new Tactics. You should plan to post back here after you've taken that next Test and we can talk through the results. GRE Masters aren't born, they're made, Rich
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