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I'm taking Intro to Theory Across the Discipline of English, US Empire and Contemporary American Lit, and What Is Poetry. So excited about all of them honestly.

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International students! How are you deciding which of your books you absolutely have to bring with you to grad school in the US? Too many of my books spark joy, and definitely not enough luggage space 😭

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19 hours ago, dilby said:

Although I should say that at Yale they have something called "Shopping" which is a two-week period at the start of the semester where you can sit in on classes before deciding whether to fully register. So who knows!

Harvard has the same, and it basically seems like an excuse to allow a ton of undergrads to show up for a week to classes they probably shouldn't be in lol.

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I'm not sure yet because we can't register for course until later in the summer, but right now I'm thinking about Contemporary Af-Am Fiction, Multiethnic American Fiction, and Feminist Theory. There's also a very interesting Black Lit and Culture course in the History department which would be great. Honestly, I'm having a hard time deciding whether to take all the courses I'm interested in and satisfy the requirements later or divide it equally. Is anyone else anxious about this? For instance, I have three requirements and there are some good courses I could take now that would satisfy them, but I also really want to take courses in my field. If I put them off, perhaps the required courses won't be as interesting (or they might be MORE interesting), and perhaps later there won't be any courses in my field (or there will be amazing ones and I'll have to pass to take another course). I'd love to get a 4 year course plan so I can make efficient choices.

2 hours ago, eddyrynes said:

International students! How are you deciding which of your books you absolutely have to bring with you to grad school in the US? Too many of my books spark joy, and definitely not enough luggage space 😭

Gonna wait until I know what books I'll need for my courses and take those, plus anything that seems like it might be useful for them. If there's room, I'll take some for general reading, especially if they're hard to find in libaries and such, or have notes I could use. I'm planning on just gradually taking more and more and asking people who come and visit to bring some when they come. Since there's still time until I have to work on thesis/comps, I can wait with my core texts.

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It's amusing that some of us are already set up for the fall semester & I just got an email today asking for my official transcripts so I can actually be a real Ph.D student now. lol. (They're busy, I know, it's totally fine. :P

1 hour ago, WildeThing said:

I'm not sure yet because we can't register for course until later in the summer, but right now I'm thinking about Contemporary Af-Am Fiction, Multiethnic American Fiction, and Feminist Theory. There's also a very interesting Black Lit and Culture course in the History department which would be great. Honestly, I'm having a hard time deciding whether to take all the courses I'm interested in and satisfy the requirements later or divide it equally. Is anyone else anxious about this? For instance, I have three requirements and there are some good courses I could take now that would satisfy them, but I also really want to take courses in my field. If I put them off, perhaps the required courses won't be as interesting (or they might be MORE interesting), and perhaps later there won't be any courses in my field (or there will be amazing ones and I'll have to pass to take another course). I'd love to get a 4 year course plan so I can make efficient choices.

I'm thinking about this problem a lot too! Mostly about the pre-1800 and post-1800 reqs (I need two courses in each), coupled with the fact that I plan on pursuing two different certificates which both have different course requirements as well. Along with all of the regular required courses + stuff that just sounds interesting.... Basically I'm gonna need a lot of guidance from whomever my advisor is about which classes to take. 😂 

Me, trying to figure all this out in my brain:

tumblr_o16n2kBlpX1ta3qyvo1_1280.thumb.jpg.0b3fb9f2c41493c26f963ea66e4895f4.jpg

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registration isn't for a while but i know i have a required intro to critical thought/theory course, whichever russian course i place into, then i need to poke a bit through the catalog and map out a happy point between a schedule that fits me and is stimulating/fulfilling. 

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On 5/16/2019 at 8:40 AM, Bopie5 said:

I'm taking Intro to Theory Across the Discipline of English, US Empire and Contemporary American Lit, and What Is Poetry. So excited about all of them honestly.

What is Poetry??? That sounds like it’s going to be awesome!

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17 hours ago, kendalldinniene said:

What is Poetry??? That sounds like it’s going to be awesome!

RIGHT! I'm soooo excited about that one. Here's a bit of the course description from the Graduate program blog page:

"“I, too, dislike it.” That is how Marianne Moore begins “Poetry,” a poem that then attempts to define the thing it claims to dislike—a distaste that it assumes (“I, too, dislike it”) you share.
This course will, in some sense, follow Moore’s strategy: We’ll begin by confronting our resistance to poetry head-on, asking where such a distaste comes from, and then teasing out the implicit understandings (of poetry, language, our selves) that activate these forms of skepticism. Is there something called “poetic language” that is fundamentally different from “ordinary language”? Where does the idea that poetry, more than any other form of literature, is centrally concerned with (and representative of) consciousness come from? What kinds of poetry does such an idea allow, and what kinds of poetry does it marginalize or obscure? These are some of the questions that will animate our discussions."

It's interesting because I have zero distaste for poetry, but I'm soooo intrigued by the idea of teasing out the implicit assumptions we have about poetry. And Claudia Rankine is on the syllabus!!!
 

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1 hour ago, Bopie5 said:

RIGHT! I'm soooo excited about that one. Here's a bit of the course description from the Graduate program blog page:

"“I, too, dislike it.” That is how Marianne Moore begins “Poetry,” a poem that then attempts to define the thing it claims to dislike—a distaste that it assumes (“I, too, dislike it”) you share.
This course will, in some sense, follow Moore’s strategy: We’ll begin by confronting our resistance to poetry head-on, asking where such a distaste comes from, and then teasing out the implicit understandings (of poetry, language, our selves) that activate these forms of skepticism. Is there something called “poetic language” that is fundamentally different from “ordinary language”? Where does the idea that poetry, more than any other form of literature, is centrally concerned with (and representative of) consciousness come from? What kinds of poetry does such an idea allow, and what kinds of poetry does it marginalize or obscure? These are some of the questions that will animate our discussions."

It's interesting because I have zero distaste for poetry, but I'm soooo intrigued by the idea of teasing out the implicit assumptions we have about poetry. And Claudia Rankine is on the syllabus!!!
 

I have to admit, I’m pretty jealous I can’t take this course. The ideas brought up in that description are fascinating. I love the question about which forms of poetry are marginalized due to our ideas about what poetry is/should be. Enjoy every second!!! I know you will 😉

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3 minutes ago, kendalldinniene said:

I have to admit, I’m pretty jealous I can’t take this course. The ideas brought up in that description are fascinating. I love the question about which forms of poetry are marginalized due to our ideas about what poetry is/should be. Enjoy every second!!! I know you will 😉

Wouldn’t be the worst idea in the world to do a syllabus/notes sharing deal on here, assuming that sort of thing is allowed (by universities, not sure if course contents are protected).

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42 minutes ago, kendalldinniene said:

I have to admit, I’m pretty jealous I can’t take this course. The ideas brought up in that description are fascinating. I love the question about which forms of poetry are marginalized due to our ideas about what poetry is/should be. Enjoy every second!!! I know you will 😉

Right!? It's such a fascinating way to approach a poetry course, and I'm sure it's going to push me a lot as both a scholar of and writer of poetry! 

 

36 minutes ago, WildeThing said:

Wouldn’t be the worst idea in the world to do a syllabus/notes sharing deal on here, assuming that sort of thing is allowed (by universities, not sure if course contents are protected).

I LOVE this idea. If it's allowed, we should definitely look into it. And if explicit notes sharing isn't allowed, I'm sure it would be beneficial even to have each other's Required Texts lists? 

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seems like i'll be taking: the biopolitical enlightenment, carribean poetics, and literary scholarship (the first of a set of required course). i'm pretty excited and terrified, though probably (absolutely) more terrified than excited lol

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my undergrad messed up sending my official transcripts on my first try. they FINALLY fixed it and now i can officially register!!! 

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Just got the nicest email from my historical fiction 1965-present professor welcoming everyone to the seminar and sharing the potential reading list, and asking for feedback/additions. Holy shit I cannot wait to start grad school 😍

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13 hours ago, kendalldinniene said:

Just got the nicest email from my historical fiction 1965-present professor welcoming everyone to the seminar and sharing the potential reading list, and asking for feedback/additions. Holy shit I cannot wait to start grad school 😍

It's so awesome that your professor reached out so far ahead of time!!!! That is so exciting. What are some of the highlights of the reading list?

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1 hour ago, illcounsel said:

It's so awesome that your professor reached out so far ahead of time!!!! That is so exciting. What are some of the highlights of the reading list?

Besides how long it is 😭😍🤓? Haha

A couple of my favorite books are on it, including Slaughterhouse-Five and Beloved, as well as a ton of Pynchon. I think I’m going to get a start on it over the summer rereading the books I do have already, for...survival purposes. 🤣

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3 minutes ago, kendalldinniene said:

Besides how long it is 😭😍🤓? Haha

 

OmG!!!!!! I've tried to get used to reading 1-3 hours a day in preparation for school. I am sure the amount of reading will still blindside me though!!!!

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2 minutes ago, illcounsel said:

OmG!!!!!! I've tried to get used to reading 1-3 hours a day in preparation for school. I am sure the amount of reading will still blindside me though!!!!

That’s what I should be doing but instead I’m mostly binging Netflix and lounging around because I know I won’t be able to soon. 

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The reading list for the What is the Contemporary? course currently looks like this: Teju Cole, Open City; Don DeLillo, Cosmopolis; Mohsin Hamid, Exit West; Barbara Kingsolver, Flight Behavior; Jamaica Kincaid, Lucy; Ruth Ozeki, A Tale for the Time Being. I haven't read any of these novels before, so that's exciting! And that it's almost all POC!

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47 minutes ago, madandmoonly said:

The reading list for the What is the Contemporary? course currently looks like this: Teju Cole, Open City; Don DeLillo, Cosmopolis; Mohsin Hamid, Exit West; Barbara Kingsolver, Flight Behavior; Jamaica Kincaid, Lucy; Ruth Ozeki, A Tale for the Time Being. I haven't read any of these novels before, so that's exciting! And that it's almost all POC!

Exit West is SO good! I enjoyed it extremely and am reading Hamid's The Reluctant Fundamentalist now. I read Exit West for a course in my undergrad on 21st Century Literatures of Displacement and Refugees and it was one of my favorite texts on the syllabus. 

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Didn’t see imposter syndrome kicking in quite this early, but that professor of mine is asking for feedback on the proposed reading list as well as additions. All of these people have already replied all with great insights and suggestions and I’m like... *crickets*

Do I even grad school, bro?

 

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