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Aghhhhh

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About Aghhhhh

  • Rank
    Caffeinated

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Woman
  • Application Season
    2020 Fall
  • Program
    Clinical Psychology PhD

Recent Profile Visitors

883 profile views
  1. I think it's awesome that you want to pursue a PhD! I'm starting my first year in a PhD program doing trauma-related work, and it has definitely been rewarding thus far. With that said, I think you should be realistic about your chances of admittance into a PhD program with no prior research experience. Research is SO important when applying to these programs--actually, I don't think I am alone is saying that research experience is probably the most important part of your application. I applied to many trauma-focused programs last cycle with lots of experience in the field (posters, presentations, 3+ years as RA/RC), and even I only received one interview. If money isn't a problem, I would say go for it this cycle. But applications are pretty expensive. I would definitely be on the lookout for a coordinator position that will help you with research output (schools really like to see pubs, posters, presentations). I think that will significantly raise your chances!
  2. A little off-topic, but I heard Trump's push for everything to reopen despite record-high cases may be his way of getting many voting polls to close in densely-populated areas (aka, democratic cities mainly), since Fall will bring about an unimaginable spike in cases. I hope this is just a conspiracy, but we've already seen this happen in Georgia during the primaries... Anyway, fuck 45.
  3. I agree with @Psyche007. Just make sure you carefully word your emails & SOPs when you apply in the future. Of course, mentors aren't looking for drones, but I also think the majority may be hesitant to take on someone with a perceived "higher than thou" attitude (even if that's not the case). Also, a PhD program offers so much more than funding: mentors, connections, and most importantly, a higher education--a privilege most people can't afford. My answer to you is to be upfront with what you want, but think about how to word it so as not to put you in a negative light. I would also implore you to not think about PhD programs as "this for that," but rather an opportunity to grow, make connections, and think critically about the prevailing ideas in your field.
  4. Honestly, I didn't complete an undergrad thesis, and I still got into a clinical psych PhD program my first round. Don't count yourself out! I did take a gap year and I did some independent research during that time (no publications, just posters & presentations). If you have zero presentations, I would consider taking a year or two to join a lab as a paid RA or, even better, RC to get those under your belt before applying.
  5. I will say that this is good advice if done WELL. This past cycle was my first time applying, and I decided to take a risk and start my SOP off by stating that I originally wanted to become a fine artist (to help explain my college trajectory but to also help my SOP stand out). Out of all the schools I applied to, only one decided to interview me--and I have a feeling it was because that PI had a similar fine arts/psych background. It ended up being an excellent research fit and I absolutely loved the program, but I also can't help but wonder if my SOP was the reason for the lack of other interviews (despite me having what I thought was near perfect research match & experience). So just be careful when considering ways to stand out! In my case, it definitely worked out because I truly feel I'm where I belong
  6. I wouldn't worry re: recommendation letters! The best relationship I've had with a faculty member was one where we only worked together for 5 months before she wrote me a letter. As long as you do good work and make sure to focus on building a relationship, it shouldn't matter too much. (Btw, I did get in to a school this round, as an fyi!) I also would definitely not retake the GRE, your scores are great. As far as I've heard, the GRE mostly acts as a cut-off--and your reading & writing scores are superb, so don't worry too much about it. It probably comes down to research experience, so just make sure to start off your position strong and try and get as many opportunities as possible!
  7. I definitely think it's acceptable at this point to ask the DCT about your status! A month is quite a while.
  8. Yikes. I really understand your frustration, having also interviewed at just one place. However, I think you should take more time to focus on your social and interpersonal skills--things that can't be measured on paper. To me, this comment comes across as arrogant, while also reducing Justice's qualifications to just having an "upper hand" by being a minority. (whether you intended for it to come across that way or not). I'm sure you interviewed extremely well, but it's insinuating comments like these that can potentially tank your chances...
  9. I also had anxiety about the offer being taken away. I also feared that they may have mistaken me for another person and would eventually figure it out and rescind the offer! I think it all stems, in some degree, from imposter syndrome--and I'm sure your first experience didn't help much at all! You got in though, that's all that matters! Now you can be confident knowing that they chose you, you are qualified, and you'll kick ass in grad school 🙂
  10. I actually ended up receiving an offer as well, so it must be a good sign!! 😀
  11. Didn't want to post here until everything was said and done, but I've officially accepted the position! Feel free to message me for any other info!! School: Auburn University Type of Program: Clinical Psychology, PhD Acceptance Date: 2/12/2020 POI: FW
  12. On the contrary, it took 3 hours to get my official letter!
  13. Hi all! I had my interview recently and I'm looking for some insight! The interview I had with my POI felt SUPER casual. To the point where I'm not sure if they really got to know me and my research interests well. I mean, I talked briefly about my experiences and how I got interested in the field, but other than that, we had a conversation that was tangential to my interests. I wasn't able to ask them many questions. It felt like a positive conversation but I left the interview wondering if I was able to sell myself enough. Does anyone else have experience with this? I mean, I figure they have my CV and personal statement & maybe it was just an interpersonal skills/personality check? Additionally, I really felt like I hit it off with the grad students and was able to articulate my research interests & have intellectual discussions with them (as well as fun discussions, too!). They pretty much told me they'd love to have me in the lab, I'm their favorite applicant, the POI really likes me, etc. Of course, I feel like I should take it with a grain of salt & not get my hopes up too much, but is this a good sign? Is this common for grad students to say? I do hope I get in because I really loved the program! Just want some objective opinions on all of this!
  14. Had my one and only interview this past weekend! I absolutely loved the program, my POI, and the grad students. I'm just trying not to keep my hopes up too high. Knowing this is my only chance to get into a program this year + really liking the program makes the wait that much more difficult.
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