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  1. ugh- LOR are tough since you have to rely on someone else to follow through for you. My best rec is to ask one additional person to write a letter -that way, you have some protection if that one person doesnt follow through and youre left hanging. As for how to politely prompt a prof? Very tough- each person is different- a polite email is always good but me personally (I'm a univ prof who does this stuff all the time), I prefer a pop in with a gentle reminder. That way, I get to refresh my memory and put a face to the name. Now, I can honestly say that I dont think I've ever missed a deadline with a LOR or had a student remind me to submit one, but if a student did need to pop in and remind me, I might be a bit embarrassed and would probably bump up my impressions of that student in my letter. just human nature I suppose. I actually go through a real LOR and explain away some of the myth on my website-- www.slpgradschool.com - may give all some insight. good luck--
  2. wow- reading through this thread (and hearing the same questions from my own students) really makes me feel for all- the whole process induces too much anxiety as there are few answers out there and min guidance. to help all those people out there and shed some light on the grad admission process, i started a website which offers guidance and advice on how to navigate the process. i've been on two different admissions committees so have a pretty good sense of whats out there-- check it out-- www.slpgradschool.com good luck and be sure to take some time for yourselves-- its a huge thing but try not to let it overwhelm you.
  3. this is where it all depends on the school youre applying to-- MOST schools primarily look at GPA/GRE - when youre receiving upwards of 400 applications, its just too much to go through each one individually so people are placed into a spreadsheet and ranked. Also, most applicants are about the same-- most have volunteered a bunch, done NSSLHA, and look relatively the same on paper so thats why GRE and GPA are such a huge thing (FYI- I'm a university prof). I would say youre absolutely fine applying without that experience-- you may want to do it for yourselt to make sure its what you want to do but most schools wont take that into consideration. I offer lots more advice and insight on my website if youre interested--- www.slpgradschool.com good luck---
  4. As the other person said, you need to go through each schools website to see which GPA they want. If they ask for both, I'd call and ask how much weight they put on each and apply to those schools which place more weight on the last 60. In addition, bilingual?? Holy cow- thats great! If it were me, I'd be researching schools with a faculty member who does research in bilingualism, contact that faculty member, and say how much I'd like to work with him/her and even be a research asst. Your skill could be a huge asset to some PHD doing research in that area. Plus, then that faculty member is in the grad coordinators ear asking for you to be admitted. I have lots of other tips and advice on my website- www.slpgradschool.com good luck--
  5. One other thing to consider is the faculty and whether or not the faculty at each school is a good fit FOR YOU. Depending on what you want to do and where you want to end up, the schools are def important (tuition, acceptance, etc), but lets say you have a huge interest in dysphagia or voice- if the faculty person who teaches those classes isnt good, then you may be at a disadvantage when you start looking for jobs. I offer tips on how to evaluate faculty on my website-- I teach at a university and started a website to give advice to people- www.slpgradschool.com good luck!
  6. hi- there's lots of scholarships out there and there's even loan forgiveness plans available. i provide more info on funding opportunities on my website at www.slpgradschool.com good luck though- youre wise to think about the debt!
  7. i would agree -- it all depends on what you want to do, where you want to end up. want to be in a top-tier medical facility? choose the more rigorous one. also- how bout a future PHD? you never know- the tougher school would better prepare you. finally- how bout networking? those tougher schools may have better networking opportunities. and even just name recognition? depending on where you want to live- one school may have a better rep than the other.
  8. youre in a good position actually with your stats-- BUT- it all depends on where you apply. Big 10 top tier school? I'd be concerned- BUT, other smaller schools? I'd be optimistic-- as long as there arent any red flags in your application. those can be the difference between a first round admit and a long wait on the waitlist. for more advice and tips on how to be strategic with your app- check out my website- www.slpgradschool.com good luck- p
  9. i would definitely apply- what have you go to lose?! your best bet is to be strategic with where you apply to. there's lots of people with low GPAs getting into grad school- one way to find those schools is to go through ashaedfind and find those schools with lower gpas. start with those. there's lots of other ways too to increase your chances- just need to be strategic with where to apply. for more advice and tips on how to increase your chances- check out my website- www.slpgradschool.com good luck- p
  10. hi--best rule of thumb for LOR is at least 2 from your dept and the 3rd from either a clinician you have a history with or some other faculty member in another dept is fine. just make sure its positive. usually the LOR isnt a deal breaker- unless its only so-so or negative. one other thing too- i'd get a 4th identified= just in case someone backs out, gets sick, or just doesnt do it. never hurts to have a back up. for more tips and advice- feel free to go to my website- www.slpgradschool.com good luck- p
  11. hi-- sadly, there isnt any magical formula on where to apply to. best bet is to go through ASHAedfind and look at LOTS of schools and find those with stats that are comparable to yours (if not lower). also- there arent even any 'safety' schools anymore- its just way too competitive. The GPA is a bit of an issue too- congrats though as most college students would LOVE to have that high of a GPA, just in our field, its right on the edge of first-admit and wait list for most schools. Great job on the GRE too. you can find more advice and tips on a competitive application on my website-- www.slpgradschool.com take care-p
  12. hi-- one piece of advice from someone who had a similar profile many years ago- apply to those schools which look at major GPA vs overall gpa. you may have to call and ask what they put more weight on but for your GPA profile, that could make or break you. i have lots of other tips and advice on www.slpgradschool.com if youre interested-- take care--p
  13. Hi all- just wanted to share a new website I started- http://slpgradschool.com/ (or just enter slpgradschool.com) to help undergraduate speech pathology and audiology students improve their chances of getting into graduate school. The site has tutorials- videos too- on all aspects of getting into grad school. I've been in the field for 12 years and have served on two different university admission committees so have a pretty good sense of what schools are looking for. On the site, I give you lots of strategic ways to improve your chances of getting in and even explain the parts of the process. For example, its the start of the fall semester-- if you are a senior, you should have asked the 3 or 4 people you've identified to write your letters of rec already. Check it out!
  14. Hi all- just wanted to share a new website I started- http://slpgradschool.com/ (or just enter slpgradschool.com) to help undergraduate speech pathology and audiology students improve their chances of getting into graduate school. The site has tutorials- videos too- on all aspects of getting into grad school. I've been in the field for 12 years and have served on two different university admission committees so have a pretty good sense of what schools are looking for. On the site, I give you lots of strategic ways to improve your chances of getting in and even explain the parts of the process. For example, its the start of the fall semester-- if you are a senior, you should have asked the 3 or 4 people you've identified to write your letters of rec already. Check it out!
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