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I made a doc that y'all can edit if you'd like for different books/sources that you really enjoy! I'll probably post it in the other thread about what people are reading and then just let it do its thing and not pester y'all about it unless someone asks for the link again. I only put primary sources because I didn't want to go overboard but y'all feel free to do either:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1s6FpFX04Nz2mHm1aSal-zr-6VXEmWdQYt0ZjB8Wg3H4/edit?usp=sharing

Best of luck to everyone next week and try to get some sleep!

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Who all are we expecting to hear from this next week? I know Johns Hopkins notified in early feb last year so they should be any time, princeton, nyu, UVA, possibly cuny... 

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1 minute ago, grace2137 said:

Who all are we expecting to hear from this next week? I know Johns Hopkins notified in early feb last year so they should be any time, princeton, nyu, UVA, possibly cuny... 

I'm also hoping for boston, michigan, and cornell 

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31 minutes ago, grace2137 said:

Who all are we expecting to hear from this next week? I know Johns Hopkins notified in early feb last year so they should be any time, princeton, nyu, UVA, possibly cuny... 

If I don't here from Indiana's Comparative Literature program I'm gonna lose my damn mind

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1 hour ago, onerepublic96 said:

I'm also hoping for boston, michigan, and cornell 

I second Michigan and Cornell! Also hoping to hear from Brown and NYU.

Is it bad that I'm sort of hoping all the rest of my decisions will be rejections because I feel stressed enough already about picking between the two offers I currently have?

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6 hours ago, The Hoosier Oxonian said:

Is it bad that I'm sort of hoping all the rest of my decisions will be rejections because I feel stressed enough already about picking between the two offers I currently have?

Mood.

This is me every time a bit of positive news enters my inbox: EQYtjgNW4AA8b_N.jpg:large

Edit: Just for the record (since my sense of humor is terrible) I'm kidding, I love several of the places I haven't heard back from, but oh man. Trying to figure out whether I should go to the café first and library second or the other way around paralyzes me with indecision most days. How will I make an even harder decision??

Edited by meghan_sparkle

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10 hours ago, grace2137 said:

Who all are we expecting to hear from this next week? I know Johns Hopkins notified in early feb last year so they should be any time, princeton, nyu, UVA, possibly cuny... 

Notre Dame, Princeton, NYU, and Colorado this week, probably. Eek! Plus, someone just posted a Cambridge interview on the results page, although I'm not panicking because I know they tend to send their applicants news at many different times throughout February and March.

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I've finally made a big pro/con spreadsheet and one of the first categories is figuring out what my annual stipend is after taxes and university fees. However, trying to figure out federal and state taxes on any of these fellowships (which so far are all in different states) is proving near impossible, even when places like Yale have extensive GSAS tax information webpages, because I am stupid. I haven't taken a math course—haven't taken anything but English literature courses, actually—since the age of 17. In the UK my wages are automatically taxed and I don't really have to do anything, and I just have to fill out an IRS form for my US taxes saying that I live in the UK with income already taxed there and make way under the threshold of taxable income.

Is there an easier way of going about this? Like a two or three-step addition and subtraction-type deal...? Like really breaking it down, Taxes-For-Dummies style. Just for my Excel spreadsheet. 

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18 minutes ago, meghan_sparkle said:

I've finally made a big pro/con spreadsheet and one of the first categories is figuring out what my annual stipend is after taxes and university fees. However, trying to figure out federal and state taxes on any of these fellowships (which so far are all in different states) is proving near impossible, even when places like Yale have extensive GSAS tax information webpages, because I am stupid. I haven't taken a math course—haven't taken anything but English literature courses, actually—since the age of 17. In the UK my wages are automatically taxed and I don't really have to do anything, and I just have to fill out an IRS form for my US taxes saying that I live in the UK with income already taxed there and make way under the threshold of taxable income.

Is there an easier way of going about this? Like a two or three-step addition and subtraction-type deal...? Like really breaking it down, Taxes-For-Dummies style. Just for my Excel spreadsheet. 

Yes, I second this please. As an international student, I have no clue how to figure out taxes in the States.Actually since I'm still a student, I still haven't had to deal with taxes to begin with so if anyone knows how to deals with this or has dealt with it could you possibly please give us some basic pointers? Or maybe a helpful youtube video or something. I'll take anything, really...

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31 minutes ago, meghan_sparkle said:

I've finally made a big pro/con spreadsheet and one of the first categories is figuring out what my annual stipend is after taxes and university fees. However, trying to figure out federal and state taxes on any of these fellowships (which so far are all in different states) is proving near impossible, even when places like Yale have extensive GSAS tax information webpages, because I am stupid. I haven't taken a math course—haven't taken anything but English literature courses, actually—since the age of 17. In the UK my wages are automatically taxed and I don't really have to do anything, and I just have to fill out an IRS form for my US taxes saying that I live in the UK with income already taxed there and make way under the threshold of taxable income.

Is there an easier way of going about this? Like a two or three-step addition and subtraction-type deal...? Like really breaking it down, Taxes-For-Dummies style. Just for my Excel spreadsheet. 

This income tax calculator should make things easier for you. Personal Finance for PhDs also has a lot of great resources on this subject. Remember folks, your schools will most likely not take taxes out of your stipends, but you will owe income tax on them! You will want to pay quarterly estimated taxes to the IRS. I recommend also setting up a savings account just for taxes, and putting funds away each stipend to pay your quarterly estimated taxes.

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12 hours ago, grace2137 said:

Who all are we expecting to hear from this next week? I know Johns Hopkins notified in early feb last year so they should be any time, princeton, nyu, UVA, possibly cuny... 

Brandeis started contacting last week and will *hopefully* contact the rest of us this week. CU Boulder was early last year, but usually they send out news in late February so they might come in this week. UNC Chapel Hill has sent out news around this week in the past as well. 

At this point, I'm not holding out for news this week - I keep getting disappointed that I don't hear back from anyone by the end of the week so I'm going to play it safe and say that this will be another 7 days of radio silence. Hooray for anguish!

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12 hours ago, grace2137 said:

Who all are we expecting to hear from this next week? I know Johns Hopkins notified in early feb last year so they should be any time, princeton, nyu, UVA, possibly cuny... 

I am really hoping to hear from CUNY and Michigan, and wondering if radio silence from UMD is a rejection because they notified earlier last year 

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1 hour ago, punctilious said:

This income tax calculator should make things easier for you. Personal Finance for PhDs also has a lot of great resources on this subject. Remember folks, your schools will most likely not take taxes out of your stipends, but you will owe income tax on them! You will want to pay quarterly estimated taxes to the IRS. I recommend also setting up a savings account just for taxes, and putting funds away each stipend to pay your quarterly estimated taxes.

This is sometimes even more complicated. Anything you're getting paid for as labor, being a GA, TA, PA, etc. will almost certainly be taxed. It's just down in the university as a regular job. Anything you receive as a fellowship may or may not be, but probably won't, so you'll have to pay estimated taxes.

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2 hours ago, Indecisive Poet said:

someone just posted a Cambridge interview on the results page

Hello, that's me! I'll share how the interview goes on this forum, if that helps? And yeah, you are right, interviews are very spaced out so you should also be hearing soon enough!! :)

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13 hours ago, grace2137 said:

Who all are we expecting to hear from this next week? I know Johns Hopkins notified in early feb last year so they should be any time, princeton, nyu, UVA, possibly cuny... 

I think Cornell is also due this week...

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3 minutes ago, WallaceShawn said:

This is sometimes even more complicated. Anything you're getting paid for as labor, being a GA, TA, PA, etc. will almost certainly be taxed. It's just down in the university as a regular job. Anything you receive as a fellowship may or may not be, but probably won't, so you'll have to pay estimated taxes.

That fellowships are taxable came as a surprise to me, but I'm recalling now a large dust-up about graduate student taxes in the debate on the 2018 tax reform bill. Is this only a recent change from that tax reform measure? Perhaps grad students who entered prior to 2017 may be able to comment...? 

(This, for me, goes in the bucket with discussions about health insurance premiums labelled "difficult to keep the discussion off American politics," but I'm doing my very best...) 

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Just now, caffeinated applicant said:

That fellowships are taxable came as a surprise to me, but I'm recalling now a large dust-up about graduate student taxes in the debate on the 2018 tax reform bill. Is this only a recent change from that tax reform measure? Perhaps grad students who entered prior to 2017 may be able to comment...? 

(This, for me, goes in the bucket with discussions about health insurance premiums labelled "difficult to keep the discussion off American politics," but I'm doing my very best...) 

It seems contrary to what I've read on gradcafe, stipends are taxed as income, even if they're not teaching fellowships ... looking at the chart here: https://gsas.yale.edu/resources-students/finances-fellowships/tax-information

After federal, FICA and state taxes, that brings Chicago's fellowship from $31k down to $25,145 take home, and Yale's from $32.7k gross to $27,097 take-home, estimated according to the calculator ... which, given cost of living in both Chicago and New Haven, is ... definitely an important consideration!

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2 minutes ago, caffeinated applicant said:

That fellowships are taxable came as a surprise to me, but I'm recalling now a large dust-up about graduate student taxes in the debate on the 2018 tax reform bill. Is this only a recent change from that tax reform measure? Perhaps grad students who entered prior to 2017 may be able to comment...? 

(This, for me, goes in the bucket with discussions about health insurance premiums labelled "difficult to keep the discussion off American politics," but I'm doing my very best...) 

So that was a whole debacle around proposed changes that would not only tax graduate students on their stipends/fellowships, but also on tuition remission. The proposal would have meant that your income wouldn't just be the $35,000 stipend you're getting from Harvard, but also the $47,000 in Harvard tuition. These together would be considered your income, so you'd be taxed on the $82,000 rather than the $35,000. Thank goodness that didn't get through because it's absolutely insane/ridiculous.

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2 minutes ago, meghan_sparkle said:

It seems contrary to what I've read on gradcafe, stipends are taxed as income, even if they're not teaching fellowships ... looking at the chart here: https://gsas.yale.edu/resources-students/finances-fellowships/tax-information

After federal, FICA and state taxes, that brings Chicago's fellowship from $31k down to $25,145 take home, and Yale's from $32.7k gross to $27,097 take-home, estimated according to the calculator ... which, given cost of living in both Chicago and New Haven, is ... definitely an important consideration!

Yes, everyone should hear this loud and clear: your stipends are taxable income (not just teaching fellowships!). You have to report them as such and pay taxes on them, which is why it's a really good idea to pay quarterly estimated taxes so you don't die when you see what you owe in taxes at the end of the year.

Cost of living as absolutely an important consideration. Many top universities are in super expensive cities (especially the Bay Area, followed by New York and Boston, those are probably the worst cost of living in the US) so make sure to factor that in when making your decisions. I believe @Warelin's spreadsheet has a cost of living column.

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1 minute ago, punctilious said:

So that was a whole debacle around proposed changes that would not only tax graduate students on their stipends/fellowships, but also on tuition remission. The proposal would have meant that your income wouldn't just be the $35,000 stipend you're getting from Harvard, but also the $47,000 in Harvard tuition. These together would be considered your income, so you'd be taxed on the $82,000 rather than the $35,000. Thank goodness that didn't get through because it's absolutely insane/ridiculous.

1 minute ago, punctilious said:

Yes, everyone should hear this loud and clear: your stipends are taxable income (not just teaching fellowships!). You have to report them as such and pay taxes on them, which is why it's a really good idea to pay quarterly estimated taxes so you don't die when you see what you owe in taxes at the end of the year.

Thanks very much for clarifying--I remembered expressly calling my senators about not taxing tuition remission, but couldn't recall whether at the time stipends were also not taxable (this seemed less important at the time, considering it's both less money and it's money that you're actually being paid, as opposed to the tuition remission you never see!).

Ugh, this is all such a nightmare--it's already so little money, and then it's carved up even more. I honestly don't mind paying my taxes at all right now when I'm working a regular full-time office job--I'm glad to pay for my neighbors' kids to go to school and my neighbors who are less fortunate than me to have health insurance! I like driving on well-paved roads and going to the public library!--but when I'm receiving what's expressly a "living stipend" because calculated hourly it would be below the minimum wage? I think I'm gonna be a bit salty! 

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26 minutes ago, WallaceShawn said:

This is sometimes even more complicated. Anything you're getting paid for as labor, being a GA, TA, PA, etc. will almost certainly be taxed. It's just down in the university as a regular job. Anything you receive as a fellowship may or may not be, but probably won't, so you'll have to pay estimated taxes.

Correct, teaching fellowships and such will make you an employee of the institution, so you will presumably have taxes taken out, but for stipends (where you aren't working, often the first year or two of your program), they will more than likely not take any taxes and may not even provide you any sort of tax document. The stipends without "employment" are what I am referring to, as people often think they don't need to pay taxes on those, but they do!

Edited by punctilious

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I'd add UC Santa Barbara based on last year.

There is also one lone waitlist for USC's creative writing/lit PhD program in the results that is absolutely maddening. I honestly consider that my longest shot (Creative Writing odds are always brutal!) but I want to know what's going on-

Edited by merry night wanderer

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